Garlic Chives

June 18, 2009


Yesterday was the first distribution of the World Peas CSA. I have been anxiously awaiting this day since I joined in April. Community Supported Agriculture combines the ideas that local farmers should have a reliable and invested market for their produce, and that people should embrace local, in season vegetables and connect with the farmers that grow their food.
Back in the day before you could get bananas in Boston in the middle of winter, local produce was all you ate. These days, many people don’t even know what types of food are grown in their region, or when they are in season, much less on which farm they are grown.
Even more than bridging the gap between eater and the land, CSA is great way to support farmers. Farming is arguably the hardest business out there, if only because so much of it is left up to pests, weeds, weather and rain. Joining a CSA, putting in money ahead of time helps to spread out the risks involved. It is also a way to put trust in farmers, fronting money for seeds, etc. in the off-season with the promise of a return of produce throughout the summer.
The World Peas/New Entry Sustainable Farming Project supports beginning farmers who might not otherwise be viable in the market. Say yes to greenhorns! It is like they say: No farms No food.
In this distribution: garlic chives, collard greens, swiss chard, lettuce, arugula, turnips, green onions, radishes, and strawberries.
http://nesfp.nutrition.tufts.edu/index.html
http://www.localharvest.org/csa/

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